Having problems with your locks?

Lock Maintenance

Your letterbox locks needs to be lubricated on a regular basis e. g. once every 3-4 months
( more often if your letterbox is exposed to severe conditions such as being close to the
seaside or main arterial roads). A spray such as "Ezi-Glide" or "Inox" applied to the lock or, a light oil such as "3 in 1", Castrol Handy Oil or any other light oil available at most retail outlets should be applied to the key and worked into the lock every 3 - 4 months (more often if your letterbox is exposed to severe conditions such as being close to the seaside or main arterial roads).

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Care and Maintenance of your Powder Coating
 
Cleaning should start at the time the mail boxes are installed, ensuring that construction materials such as concrete, plaster and paint splashes are removed before they have a chance to dry. Failure to remove these materials at this early stage will require the use of aggressive cleaning materials and techniques with potential damage to the powder coated surface.
 
The best method of cleaning is by regular washing of the coating using a solution of warm water and non abrasive pH neutral detergent solution. Surfaces should be thoroughly rinsed after cleaning to remove all residues. All surfaces should be cleaned using a soft cloth or sponge , using nothing harder than natural bristle brushes.
 
The frequency of cleaning depends in part on the standard of appearance that is required and also the requirement to remove deposits which could , during prolonged contact with either the powder film or the metal substrate, (if exposed) cause damage.
 
Deposited grime absorbs moisture like a sponge and holds it against the powder coated surface, this permits corrosive attack to proceed, thereby damaging the coating which cannot be restored without removal.
 
In industrial environments the normal frequency of cleaning should be at not more than three monthly intervals. However where there is high atmospheric pollution or extremely hazardous atmosphere (i.e. a combination of factors) this period should be reduced to monthly cleaning if deterioration of the coating is to be prevented. Where the atmosphere is deemed to be non hazardous e.g. "Rural or normal urban environments", then the period between cleaning can be extended to six months. However, if heavy soiling occurs, more regular cleaning is recommended.
 
From recommendations by AKZO NOBEL suppliers of Interpon Powder Coatings.


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Care and Maintenance of your Anodised Product

Deterioration of the Anodised coating can occur, mainly as a result of grime build up which retains contaminated moisture permitting attack of the surface thereby damaging the finish.

Cleaning should start at the time the mail boxes are installed, ensuring that construction materials such as concrete, plaster and paint splashes are removed before they have a chance to dry. Failure to remove these materials at this early stage will require the use of aggressive cleaning materials and techniques with potential damage to the Anodised surface.

If regularly maintained washing down Anodised Aluminium with warm water containing a suitable wetting agent or with mild soap solution. Hand rubbing is often used for small mailbox installations, larger projects utensils such as fibre brushes may be used.

It is necessary to thoroughly rinse with water after cleaning especially where crevices are present to ensure removal of all residues.

DO NOT USE. - high abrasive materials such as steel wool or emery paper to remove grime.

Acid or Alkaline cleaners are not recommended as they can damage the anodised coating.

 

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Care and Maintenance of Stainless Steel

Surface contamination and the formation of deposits are critical factors which may lead to drastically reduced life. These contaminants may be minute particles of iron or rust from other non-stainless steels used in nearby construction and not subsequently removed. Industrial, commercial and even domestic and naturally occurring atmospheric conditions can result in deposits which can be quite corrosive.

Strong acid solutions (e.g. hydrochloric acid or "sprits of salts") are sometimes used to clean masonry and tiling of buildings but they should never be permitted to come into contact with metals, including stainless steel. If this should happen the acid solution must be removed immediately by copious water flushing.

Stainless Steel is easy to clean. Washing with soap or a mild detergent and warm water followed by clean water rinse then wipe the cleaned surface with a dry cloth.

For further information down load the articles below or visit the Austral Wright web site, www.australwright.com.au



What About Polish

Removing Tea Staining

Popular Myths about Stainless Steel

Stainless Steel Finishes

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